Freemasons, World Order, and Mind Wars: The Great Reality of Memphis-Misraim Masonry

Freemasons, World Order, and Mind Wars: The Great Reality of Memphis-Misraim Masonry

Freemasons, World Order, and Mind Wars: The Great Reality of Memphis-Misraim Masonry

Freemasons, World Order, and Mind Wars: The Great Reality of Memphis-Misraim Masonry

Synopsis

Many have speculated on the role played by Freemasons in launching the French and American Revolutions, and in today's Bohemian Grove and other secretive forums where world events seem to be shaped.This book presents the history of Freemasonry in a philosophically rigorous and eloquent way and proposes a new philosophically significant and historically meaningful Freemasonic path. Along the way, the author casts light on important, little understood aspects of world history, presenting an enlightening narrative of world events.Dr. Nicolas Laos is the Founder and President of the autonomous, international Freemasonic and scholarly fraternity United Traditionalist Grand Sanctuaries of the Ancient and Primitive Rite Memphis-Misraim. He names many of the prominent men who have been members over the centuries, and provides a history of Freemasonry, and discusses how the movement spread, how it relates to religion, international affairs and world history, and the symbolism used.

Excerpt

”… I have become all things to all men,
that I may by all means save some …”

1 Corinthians 9:22

A. Esotericism

The term ‘esotericism’ is controversial and is often confused with the colloquial adjectival sense of something that is obscure and technical or that pertains to the minutiae of a particular area of common knowledge. the term esotericism derives from the Greek root ‘eso’, which means inner. Plato, in his dialogue Alcibiades, uses the expression “ta eso”, meaning the inner things, and, in his dialogue Theaetetus, he uses the expression “ta exo”, meaning “the outside things”. the Greek adjective ‘esoterikos’ (esoteric) was coined by the rhetorician and satirist Lucian of Samosata (second century AD) in his book The Auction of Lives (paragraph 26). the term ‘esoteric’ first appeared in English in Thomas Stanley’s History of Philosophy, which was published in 1701. Thomas Stanley used the term esoteric in order to describe the mystery-school of Pythagoras, since the Pythagoreans were divided into the exoteric circle (under training) and the esoteric circle (admitted into the ‘inner’ circle). the corresponding noun ‘esotericism’ was coined by the French philosopher and historian Jacques Matter in his book Histoire Critique Du Gnosticisme (1828), and it was popularized by the nineteenth century French occult author and ceremonial magician Eliphas Lévi (born Alphonse Louis Constant).

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