The Fightin' Texas Aggie Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor

The Fightin' Texas Aggie Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor

The Fightin' Texas Aggie Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor

The Fightin' Texas Aggie Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor

Synopsis

By any measure, the battles of Bataan and Corregidor were among the most intensely fought and devastating episodes in the World War II Pacific theater. Beginning in early 1942, the Japanese Imperial Army invaded the Philippines in an attempt to control the Pacific region and expand its sphere of influence. The defense and last stand of Filipino and American allied forces marked the largest surrender in their respective military histories. Their efforts slowed the Japanese advance but only at great cost.

John A. Adams Jr. provides a new and compelling exploration of these pivotal events by recounting the history of Bataan and Corregidor through the eyes of 89 soldiers and officers who were former students and citizen soldiers from the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas. All were products of the Corps of Cadets, and indeed no other institution could boast of such a large deployment in the opening of the war.

While many words have been written on Bataan and Corregidor, none have taken the approach of collective biography as The Fightin' Texas Aggie Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor does here. As a result, this book is not only a new contribution to the history of World War II but also stands to be a landmark publication on the history of Texas A&M University.

Excerpt

After my knee wound was dressed, I returned to our bivouac for some desperately needed rest. I had lost my bedroll at Moron, and Lieutenant Cliff Hardwicke ‘37 kindly offered me his. It was a selfless gesture, typical of the tall, courtly young Texan, for though the days were suffocating, the nights were wet and chilly. Hardwicke stretched out on the ground beside me and pulled from his pocket a cable [telegram] he had received from his father in Texas.

It read simply, Give ’em hell, son.

I handed the telegram back with a nod, thanked him for the bedroll, wrapped myself up, and was asleep in an instant. Before I awoke next morning, Cliff Hardwicke was dead. He had ridden early into Moron to recover our horses. As he was leading them out, a sniper shot him through the head, killing him instantly; his body had to be left behind.

Captain Edwin P. Ramsey Near Moron, Bataan: January 16, 1942

The family of Lt. Hardwicke ‘37 was posthumously awarded his Silver Star for
Bravery at Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, in 1943.

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