Hudson's Heritage: A Chronicle of the Founding and the Flowering of the Village of Hudson, Ohio

Hudson's Heritage: A Chronicle of the Founding and the Flowering of the Village of Hudson, Ohio

Hudson's Heritage: A Chronicle of the Founding and the Flowering of the Village of Hudson, Ohio

Hudson's Heritage: A Chronicle of the Founding and the Flowering of the Village of Hudson, Ohio

Synopsis

Grace Goulder Izant spent the last six decades of her long and productive life in Hudson, Ohio, and this, her final book, was the one that lay closest to her heart. Bringing to it her knowledge as a historian of Ohio, she lifts the story beyond the limitations of local history and makes it illuminate an entire region and time. Illustrated with numerous historical photographs and drawings from her private collection, this edition preserves the enduring quality and historical heritage of this quaint village.

Excerpt

By Thomas L. Vince

In the spring of 1975, when she was nearly 82 years old, Grace Goulder Izant decided that the time had come for her to begin work on a new book. Her John D. Rockefeller. the Cleveland Years had been published a few years before, and her vitality and energy remained undiminished. She had recently given a charming talk to the Hudson Heritage Association about coming to Hudson in 1924 with her young family, and friends had encouraged her to write more about Hudson. Grace Izant’s own arrival in Hudson coincided with the end of the “Ellsworth era,” a period of renovation and renewal dominated by the town-planning ideas of community benefactor James W. Ellsworth. It also marked the beginning of Hudson’s life as a desirable exurban town where the amenities and friendliness of small-town life could still be found in abundance. Although she had come from a socially prominant Cleveland family and had graduated from Vassar College, Mrs. Izant and her family felt comfortable in Hudson and immediately became active in community life.

As a young college graduate in Cleveland, Grace Goulder had been hired as a society reporter for the Cleveland Plain Dealer and had pursued a career as a journalist before her marriage to Robert J. Izant. By the late 1930s, with her three children well along in school, she had resumed her career by writing freelance articles for the Plain Dealer. One of the earliest in this series was an article about the centennial of Hudson’s incorporation as a village in the summer of 1937. She continued writing an occasional feature story and in 1940 did a series titled “Ohio Songs and Citizens,” which began with an article about Minnie Johnson, owner of John Brown’s “Old Tannery Farm” in Hudson. By 1944 she was asked to write human-interest stories with an Ohio background, and the result was her long-running series “Ohio Scenes and Citizens,” which appeared weekly in the “Pictorial” section of the Plain Dealer. For the next twenty-five years she, and often Robert, wandered through Ohio, searching out stories that she then turned into features that would both inform and delight her readers.

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