The Complete Marching Band Resource Manual: Techniques and Materials for Teaching, Drill Design, and Music Arranging

The Complete Marching Band Resource Manual: Techniques and Materials for Teaching, Drill Design, and Music Arranging

The Complete Marching Band Resource Manual: Techniques and Materials for Teaching, Drill Design, and Music Arranging

The Complete Marching Band Resource Manual: Techniques and Materials for Teaching, Drill Design, and Music Arranging

Synopsis

The Complete Marching Band Resource Manual is the definitive guide to the intricate art of directing college and high school marching bands. Supplemented with musical arrangements, warm-up exercises, and over a hundred drill charts, this manual presents both the fundamentals and the advanced techniques that are essential for successful marching band leadership. The materials in this volume cover every stage of musical direction and instruction, from selecting music and choreographing movements to improving student memorization and endurance to the creation of striking visual configurations through uniform and auxiliary units.

Now in its third edition, The Complete Marching Band Resource Manual has been thoroughly updated to reflect new standards for drill design, charting, and musical arrangement. Offering a fresh approach to the essentials of good marching band design, this comprehensive resource shows both veteran and novice band directors how to prepare students to perform seamless and sophisticated musical formations.

Excerpt

Over the past four decades the performance practice of marching bands has evolved into an art form separate from its roots in service to athletic events and parades. While most marching bands still serve these functions, they are no longer the sole reasons for the bands’ existence. Marching band shows have evolved into eight- to twelve-minute performances complete with elaborate props and staging, dancing, synthesized sounds, and singing. Drill design has come to focus on a logical visual progression that is coordinated with the phrases and climaxes of the music; it is no longer movement that simply matches the music according to the number of counts available. This evolution has been accompanied by many changes in the way marching band is taught. Directors now enlist the aid of percussion and auxiliary specialists to assist them in developing and teaching the show. Although they are very helpful, these specialists usually are not trained music educators, and it remains for the director to maintain control of the overall design of the show and the teaching style used with the students. This book teaches the fundamental concepts the music educator needs in order to design the drill, arrange the music, and teach the show.

Instrumentation

The instrumentation of the marching band is flexible, especially in the drumline battery and front ensemble percussion sections. While instrumentation varies depending upon arranger and band, the standard instrumentation of wind instruments includes a piccolo part, a flute part, one or two clarinet parts, one or two alto saxophone parts, a tenor saxophone part, one or two horn in F or B-flat parts, three trumpet parts, two trombone parts, a baritone part, and a tuba part. This instrumentation is sometimes extended by a baritone saxophone, flugelhorn, or third trombone part.

The drumline battery is made up of snare drums, cymbals, tenor drums, and pitched bass drums. the number of bass drums varies according to the size of the band. Since the bass drums are definite pitches, the director can vary the number used based upon the music. Instruments of the drumline are staged on the field with the wind players. the drumline is augmented by the front ensemble (or pit), which consists of marimba, xylophone, bells, timpani, chimes, tam-tams, gongs, electric bass and rock guitar, electronic keyboards, and other instruments too cumbersome to carry onto the field. Front ensemble . . .

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