Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War: Letters of the Anderson, Brockman, and Moore Families, 1853-1865

Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War: Letters of the Anderson, Brockman, and Moore Families, 1853-1865

Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War: Letters of the Anderson, Brockman, and Moore Families, 1853-1865

Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War: Letters of the Anderson, Brockman, and Moore Families, 1853-1865

Synopsis

This collection of 124 letters written by members of the Moore, Anderson and Brockman families of South Carolina, describes the periods leading up to and during the American Civil War.

Excerpt

Melissa Walker and Tom Moore Craig

In the rolling foothills of Spartanburg County, South Carolina, the Anderson and Moore families established themselves on the banks of the North and South Tyger rivers. They carved out new farms on former Cherokee hunting grounds near the present communities of Moore and Reidville. They had arrived in the Piedmont of South Carolina in the 1760s, having made their way earlier from northern Ireland to Philadelphia and to the Pennsylvania backcountry before beginning the long trek south down the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road.

Typical of the Scots-Irish settlers, Charles Moore (1727–1805) had come to America in the early 1750s, probably from county Antrim, northern Ireland. His wife was Mary Barry; it is not certain when they married. After a short time in Pennsylvania, he joined the migration south and lived in Old Anson County, North Carolina, where his signature has been found as a witness to deeds in 1752 and 1762. On May 30, 1763, he was granted 550 acres on the North Tyger River by King George iii. the survey, completed in July, indicated that the parcel was surrounded on all sides by “vacant land.” He and his wife, Mary, first took up residence under a lean-to shelter near the river while clearing land and constructing a house on higher ground nearby. This latter residence, made of hewn logs covered with clapboards, still stands and is known as Walnut Grove Plantation. It is restored and open to the public.

Charles and Mary had ten children, all surviving to adulthood. the oldest daughter, Margaret Catherine “Kate,” born 1752, married Captain Andrew Barry and was a scout and spy for the patriots in the American Revolution. Their seventh child, Thomas (1759–1822), served seven terms in the U.S. Congress, 1801–13 and 1815–17. He was the general in charge of the defense of Charleston in the War of 1812. Charles and Mary’s ninth child, Dr. Andrew Barry Moore (1771–1848), practiced medicine from his small office located on the family plantation for fifty years and is the father of three of the letter writers, Margaret Anna Moore Means, Andrew Charles Moore, and Thomas John Moore. the tenth . . .

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