Ordines Coronationis Franciae: Texts and Ordines for the Coronation of Frankish and French Kings and Queens in the Middle Ages - Vol. 2

Ordines Coronationis Franciae: Texts and Ordines for the Coronation of Frankish and French Kings and Queens in the Middle Ages - Vol. 2

Ordines Coronationis Franciae: Texts and Ordines for the Coronation of Frankish and French Kings and Queens in the Middle Ages - Vol. 2

Ordines Coronationis Franciae: Texts and Ordines for the Coronation of Frankish and French Kings and Queens in the Middle Ages - Vol. 2

Synopsis

The ordines coronationis are essentially the scripts for the coronation of Frankish and French sovereigns. Combining detailed religious, ceremonial, and political material, they are an extraordinarily important source for the study of individual rulers or dynasties, as well as for the study of kingship, queenship, and the evolution of political institutions. Complete in two volumes, Richard A. Jackson's is the first full edition of these texts, including all the ordines from the early thirteenth century through the end of the fifteenth century, a period during which the texts shift from Latin to the vernacular, and the institutions of kingship become distinctively French.

Excerpt

Rarely, if ever, can a work of this magnitude be the work of a single individual, and I take pleasure in noting that I have been most fortunate in obtaining financial aid and in having the help of outstanding advisors and collaborators. in 1994–95 the National Endowment for the Arts provided me with an Editions Grant that enabled me to devote the entire year to this volume, as well as to travel to France and to the Vatican City for one final examination of several manuscripts. a grant from the University of Houston covered the cost of the photographs and the publication rights for the plates. As with Vol. I, Elizabeth A. R. Brown, Reinhard Elze, Edward M. Peters, and Hervé Pinoteau provided encouragement, help, and occasional readings from manuscripts or books that were not readily available to me. Abbé Raymond Etaix discovered a most important manuscript in Paris (Ordo xxiii, ms F), and he requested that Abbé Jean Goy communicate his discovery to me. Craig Taylor provided me with a careful transcription of Ordo xxa, ms J. Anne Walters Robertson gave me helpful advice concerning the liturgy at several points. Bernard Barbiche, the late T. Julian Brown, Patrick Demouy, and Sylvie Lefèvre also provided help with texts in Vol. ii. Virginia Jackson proofread and corrected the English parts of my manuscript of Vol. ii, just as she did for Vol. I. Special gratitude is due to four individuals. Hans-Erich Keller, whose knowledge of Middle French has few equals, examined my editions of the French texts in detail and made copious suggestions that not only improved my transcriptions of the texts in Vol. ii, but that also enabled me to avoid a legion of ignorant mistakes. Claude Buridant gave me excellent advice concerning which variants to retain and which to discard in some of the Middle French texts, he minutely examined Ordo xxb in the attempt to determine the date of the translation, and he suggested many improvements to my edition of Ordo XXIIB-C, even going so far as to make his own transcription of Ordo xxiib. Reinhard Elze carefully read the entire manuscript, suggested numerous improvements, and corrected my typing errors, whether in Latin, German, French, or English. Dr. Dennis Levi of the University of Houston’s School of Optometry was particularly helpful over the years as he resolved my visual problems and provided me with carefully designed corrective lenses that enabled me to devote uncountable hours to the computer screen and microfilm reader. Once again, I appreciate the help given by the gentle staff of the University of Pennsylvania Press: Alison Anderson, Managing Editor; Carl Gross, Design and Production Manager; Jerome SinGerman, Humanities Editor; and Patricia A. Steele, Copy Editor.

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