The Generation of '72: Latin America's Forced Global Citizens

The Generation of '72: Latin America's Forced Global Citizens

The Generation of '72: Latin America's Forced Global Citizens

The Generation of '72: Latin America's Forced Global Citizens

Synopsis

Caught between the well-worn grooves the Boom and the Gen-X have left on the Latin American literary canon, the writing intellectuals that comprise what the Generation of '72 have not enjoyed the same editorial acclaim or philological framing as the literary cohorts that bookend them. In sociopolitical terms, they neither fed into the Cold War-inflected literary prizes that sustained the Boom nor the surge in cultural capital in Latin American cities from which the writers associated with the Crack and McOndo have tended to write. This book seeks to approach the Generation of '72 from the perspective of cosmopolitanism and global citizenship, a theoretical framework that lends a fresh and critical architecture to the unique experiences and formal responses of a group of intellectuals that wrote alongside globalization's first wave.

Excerpt

Brantley Nicholson University of Richmond

Sophia A. McClennen Pennsylvania State University

A very poignant moment stands out in Cristina Peri Rossi’s “La influencia de Edgar A. Poe en la poesía de Raimundo Arenas.” in a confrontation between the child narrator and her exiled father, the voice of the child-narrator breaks with the impersonal third person account and delivers an unexpectedly pithy knockout line: “Estoy segura de que lo que piensas acerca de nuestra generación es completamente falso” (52). the idea of generational rupture is certainly not a new feature of literary transformation, but there is something in the bold and decisive way that this line is delivered, something in the notion that the father cannot understand his child, that characterizes the break that takes place in the literary generation we refer to in this collection as the Generation of ’72. in contrast to the generational testimonies and World Literary schematics that stand on either side of the Generation of ‘72, there have been no critical collections, definitive testimonies, or telltale autobiographies dedicated to the authors that fall between the Boom and the recently famed anti-Boom: Roberto Bolaño and the Generation X that is generally subsumed under the monikers Crack and McOndo. While this group has, at times, been studied as the post-boom or the writers of the postmodern turn, we think that there is value to be added to those approaches by framing this cohort of writers . . .

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