Recovery Groups: A Guide to Creating, Leading, and Working with Groups for Addictions and Mental Health Conditions

Recovery Groups: A Guide to Creating, Leading, and Working with Groups for Addictions and Mental Health Conditions

Recovery Groups: A Guide to Creating, Leading, and Working with Groups for Addictions and Mental Health Conditions

Recovery Groups: A Guide to Creating, Leading, and Working with Groups for Addictions and Mental Health Conditions

Synopsis

This book focuses on community self-help and support groups specifically in the context of recovery movements in addiction and mental health care. The idea of groups of recovering people meeting together may seem like a simple one and not one requiring much effort and thought; however, as this book will show, this is not the case. In Recovery Groups: A Guide to Creating, Leading, and Working with Groups for Addictions and Mental Health Conditions Linda Kurtz breaks down the recovery movement for addictions and mental health care into three sections. In the first section recovery concepts are broken down into two fields: how they differ and how they come together. The second section focuses on methods of working with independent self-help groups and leadership in support groups. Kurtz touches on the study of helping mechanisms, social climate, group teachers, group structure, and how to use each of these to improve group performance. In the third section of the book, Kurtz examines social and community actions from members involved in Twelve-Step fellowships and consumer survivor organizations. The final section also details programs that provide employment, housing, and mutual support, explaining how to accomplish these goals without a large expense. This book will be useful to students, professional mental health and addiction workers, recovery coaches and peer support specialists, and group members and leaders who are interested in this topic.

Excerpt

Recent decades stand as a watershed era in the history of recovery as an organizing construct for addiction treatment and mental health services in the United States and other countries. Recovery mutual-aid groups are growing exponentially, as evidenced by their number, size, philosophical diversification, and increased specialization. New recovery-support institutions—grass-roots recovery community organizations, centers, clubhouses, cafes, residences, schools, industries, and ministries—continue to spread. Advocacy movements organized by and for people in recovery are coming of age and mobilizing numbers of people that would have been unthinkable only a few years ago. Approaches to professional treatment are being extended from models of acute stabilization and palliative care to assertive models of long-term personal and family recovery. Representation of people in recovery is growing at all levels within behavioral health systems, with peer recovery-support services flourishing amid growing calls to create recovery-oriented systems of care. The vision and reality of long-term recovery are reshaping behavioral health policies, programs, and front-line service practices. If there is what could be called an age of recovery, we are clearly entering it.

And if there is a ground zero from which this recovery revolution is unfolding, it is clearly the critical mass that has been reached through the growth of recovery mutual-aid groups. The increased professionalization and commercialization of addiction treatment and mental health services in the mid-twentieth century led to . . .

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