Behavioral Addictions: DSM-5 and beyond

Behavioral Addictions: DSM-5 and beyond

Behavioral Addictions: DSM-5 and beyond

Behavioral Addictions: DSM-5 and beyond

Synopsis

This book explains the rationale for changes in the DSM-5RG related to incorporating behavioral addictions alongside substance use disorders; it also illuminates the significance of including the construct of behavioral addictions in this widely used psychiatric diagnostic manual. The chapters herien describe eight behaviors often considered addictions, including gambling disorder, internet gaming disorder, internet addiction, food addiction, hypersexuality, shopping addiction, exercise addiction, and tanning addiction. Also examined are prevalence rates in epidemiological samples, risk factors, and promising treatment approaches. The result is an easy-to-use resource and guide for clinicians, students, and researchers.

Excerpt

The concept of behavioral addiction has been a topic of debate for decades. Research and clinical experiences suggest that behaviors that occur in extremes can result in substantial problems, regardless of the nature of the specific activity. People can smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol, use drugs, gamble, play video games, use the Internet, engage in sexual activities, shop, exercise, eat, or tan to excess. Growing evidence indicates that extensive, repetitive, and problematic engagement in these activities can share some similarities with substance use disorders. Overlap may exist in terms of phenomenology (craving, tolerance, and withdrawal), natural history (onset, chronicity, and relapsing course), comorbidity, genetic overlap and neurobiological mechanisms, and response to treatment. As the behaviors increase in frequency and duration, they can lead to psychological distress and sometimes even physical impairment, as well as diminish social, financial, and occupational functioning.

Addiction, however, is a loaded term. It has different meanings to different people. Colloquially, it refers to excessive use of a substance or participation in a behavior. Clinically, it can signify loss of control and impairment in functioning. Substance use disorders are often called “addictions,” and they have been recognized as psychiatric diseases for . . .

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