The Intelligent Clinician's Guide to the DSM-5

The Intelligent Clinician's Guide to the DSM-5

The Intelligent Clinician's Guide to the DSM-5

The Intelligent Clinician's Guide to the DSM-5

Synopsis

The Intelligent Clinician's Guide to the DSM-5RG is the second edition of the widely-read book first published in 2013. This second edition is thoroughly revised, and has several new chapters describing the response to the publication of the new manual, as well as suggestions on its use in clinical practice. The Intelligent Clinician's Guide to the DSM-5RG, Second Edition reviews the history of diagnosis in psychiatry, emphasizing the limitations for classification of our current lack of knowledge of the causes of most mental disorders. It emphasizes that, in the absence of biomarkers, current categories can only be considered provisional. It takes a critical look at schema for spectra and dimensionalization of diagnosis, examines the borders between normality and psychopathology, and discusses the problem of clinical utility. The book has chapters on all the major diagnoses in psychiatry, in which the main problems of diagnosis are addressed, and in which all changes in DSM-5 are described.

Excerpt

The first edition of this book was published at the same time as DSM-5 in May 2013. The timing supported a welcome level of interest in the book and met a need in the clinical community to know what to expect from the latest edition of the standard diagnostic manual.

However, the first edition was based on the version of the manual that was posted on the Web in December 2012. There were some last-minute changes in the final version of DSM-5, albeit not major ones, that did not find their way into my book. Another reason for a second edition is that research published since 2013 has helped clarify some of the questions raised in the original book. Also, DSM-5 stimulated a large amount of comment from the medical and scientific communities, as well as from the educated public. Reviews of books critical of DSM-5 appeared in major media outlets, and only a few weeks before publication, the National Institute of Mental Health offered a radically different alternative. All these issues deserve discussion, and the publication of a second edition provides me with an opportunity to address these issues.

I have also added two new chapters, one on the response to DSM-5 and one on how to use the manual in clinical practice. Finally, because DSM-5 is only a small part of a large story, I will have more to say on the future of psychiatric diagnosis.

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