Smart Communities: How Citizens and Local Leaders Can Use Strategic Thinking to Build a Brighter Future

Smart Communities: How Citizens and Local Leaders Can Use Strategic Thinking to Build a Brighter Future

Smart Communities: How Citizens and Local Leaders Can Use Strategic Thinking to Build a Brighter Future

Smart Communities: How Citizens and Local Leaders Can Use Strategic Thinking to Build a Brighter Future

Synopsis

The new edition of the acclaimed guide to strategic decision-making in community planning, development, and collaboration

Based on the results of more than a decade of research by the Pew Partnership for Civic Change, Smart Communities provides directions for strategic decision-making and outlines the key strategies used by thousands of leaders who have worked to create successful communities. Outlining seven "leverage points" for decision-making used by thousands of leaders who have worked to create successful communities, this new Second Edition offers leaders from both the public and private sectors the tools they need to build a civic infrastructure and create a better future for all the community's citizens.

  • Second Edition has been thoroughly updated with current knowledge and research
  • Covers new developments from current design thinking and strategy literature to innovation and invention in communities
  • Advises on how to create community readiness that will help avert problems before they begin
  • All case vignettes have been revised to include more detailed information about the process and application of the seven leverage points
  • Examples from communities around the country illustrate how these change agents' well-structured decision-making processes can be traced to their effective use of the seven key leverage points

Smart Communities offers hope to those who are striving to improve their communities and addresses vital issues such as poverty, race relations, and children's health and welfare.

Excerpt

Ten years ago the world had not talked on an iPhone; communicated via YouTube, Twitter, or Facebook; learned the ins and outs of organizational politics from characters on The Office; or seen the nation’s talent on American Idol. Three-dimensional printers now are making artificial limbs more compatible; dental crowns, implants, and dentures more affordable; and the prospects for new applications unlimited. No one would argue that enormous technological and social changes have not occurred during the past decade.

Unfortunately, far too much has not changed. Rates of poverty hover at the 15 percent mark, and too many Americans barely make ends meet, if at all. the world watched while Hurricane Katrina exposed our national inequities through the lens of New Orleans; Detroit and Kodak went bankrupt; and Youngstown shrank. the culprit for the downward spiral is not one thing or one program or even the Great Recession of 2007–2009, but a concentration of systemic issues. in this cloud of dust, however, places such as Houston grew, an auto trail in the South was forged, and regions such as the Fox Cities showed how it is done. Research over the last fifty years says that if policies, practices, programs, and the public will could align, the numbers would improve and self-sufficiency would increase. a clear definition of the problems and challenges, an openness to opportunities, and an implementation strategy for the long run are needed to make real change. the secret formula is merging how to work with precise community priorities.

With so much of our lives going online, day-to-day interactions have taken a hit. However, in our bigger, better, faster world of the twenty-first century, some fundamental requirements hold firm.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.