Fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing: Tips and Strategies for Addressing Common Clinical Challenges

Fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing: Tips and Strategies for Addressing Common Clinical Challenges

Fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing: Tips and Strategies for Addressing Common Clinical Challenges

Fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing: Tips and Strategies for Addressing Common Clinical Challenges

Synopsis

Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based communication style that has applicability to diverse professions ranging from mental and physical healthcare to criminal justice. Professionals use MI to help patients/clients harness their own internal motivations for change and become active partners in developing plans for change. Using MI, a professional can guide patients/clients to make positive changes in life areas such as substance abuse, criminal activity, anxiety and mood problems, poor cardiovascular health, and more. Fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing provides a straightforward, common-language, and user-friendly guide to key concepts in MI. The clinical challenges addressed are ubiquitous across helping professions, and this book is unique in its focus on providing practical guidance on what to do when confronted with each challenge. Based on the authors' years of experience providing training and supervision in MI, this book answers one of the questions most frequently asked by those they have trained: "How can I use MI to address [insert clinical challenge]?"Fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing is an accessible and easy-to-use resource organized and written with the busy provider in mind. It is appropriate for all skill levels ranging from the MI novice with no prior training, to the experienced MI provider seeking to gain new knowledge and skills. Throughout the book the authors use boxes and case examples to clearly illustrate and emphasize key points. The authors also provide clear examples of the sometimes subtle distinction between MI-consistent and MI-inconsistent use of the communication skills and strategies. Professionals from diverse disciplines including medicine, allied health, criminal justice, psychology, counseling, social work, marriage and family therapy, as well as MI trainers working with all of these disciplines will find this book a useful resource, and it would be an appropriate text for any class that seeks to build MI and other psychotherapeutic skills.

Excerpt

As described more fully in chapter 2 of this book, motivational interviewing, or MI, is a communication style that providers can use to help facilitate client change. If you are new to motivational interviewing and have just begun reading Fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing: Tips and Strategies for Addressing Common Clinical Challenges, you are probably asking yourself two key questions: (1) “Does MI work?”; and 2) “How do I learn MI?” Whether you are a novice or experienced provider of MI, you are probably asking yourself, “How will this book be helpful to me?” Here we provide answers to these vital questions about MI and outline the key features of this book, its intended audience, and how to use what you learn.

DOES MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING WORK?

Although initially developed and written about by Dr. William R. Miller as an intervention for alcohol use disorders (1983), in the more than 30 years since the original article on MI was published, MI has been applied successfully to promote positive change in areas ranging from reducing problem drinking (Vasilaki, Hosier, & Cox, 2006), to weight loss (Armstrong et al., 2011), to reducing criminal offenses (McMurran, 2009), to utilization of life-saving clean water technologies in Zambia (Thevos, Quick, & Yanduli, 2000). To say research on MI has been burgeoning may be an understatement. Lundahl and Burke (2009) reported that entering the term “motivational interviewing” into a single research database (PsycInfo) in March 2009 resulted in the retrieval of 707 articles published during the decade from 2000 to 2009! Although the potential uses of MI are seemingly boundless, it is important that all providers who wish to use MI are aware of the current evidence supporting (and in some cases failing to support) various applications of MI.

At least four comprehensive reviews of the MI literature using a statistical approach called meta-analysis have been published in the last decade (e.g., Burke, Arkowitz, & Menchola, 2003; Hettema, Steele, & Miller, 2005; Lundahl, Kunz, Brownell, Tollefson, & Burke, 2010; Rubak, Sandbaek, Lauritzen, & Christensen, 2005). These reviews have statistically combined the findings . . .

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