Transnational Cooperation: An Issue-Based Approach

Transnational Cooperation: An Issue-Based Approach

Transnational Cooperation: An Issue-Based Approach

Transnational Cooperation: An Issue-Based Approach

Synopsis

Transnational Cooperation: An Issue-Based Approach presents an analysis of transnational cooperation or collective action that stresses basic concepts and intuition. Throughout the book, authors Clint Peinhardt and Todd Sandler identify factors that facilitate and/or inhibit such cooperation. The first four chapters lay the analytical foundations for the book, while the next nine chapters apply the analysis to a host of exigencies and topics of great importance.

The authors use elementary game theory as a tool for illustrating the ideas put forth in the text. Game theory reminds us that rational actors (for example, countries, firms, or individuals) must account for the responses by other rational actors. The book assumes no prior knowledge of game theory; all game-theoretic concepts and analyses are explained in detail to the reader. Peinhardt and Sandler also employ paired comparisons in illustrating the book's concepts. The book is rich in applications and covers a wide range of topics, including superbugs, civil wars, money laundering, financial crises, drug trafficking, terrorism, global health concerns, international trade liberalization, acid rain, leadership, sovereignty, and many others. Students, researchers, and policymakers alike have much to gain from Transnational Cooperation. It is a crossover book for economics, political science, and public policy.

Excerpt

Transnational, regional, and global challenges abound in today’s interdependent world and require cooperation among countries. In some instances, multiple countries must jointly address a contingency (for example, the spread of an agriculture pest); in other cases, countries in the same geographical region must act in concert to alleviate a concern (for example, acid rain); and in still other scenarios, all countries of the world must work together to achieve an outcome (for example, curbing climate change). The need for transnational cooperation among countries will grow in importance as globalization increases cross-border exchanges of a desirable and undesirable nature. The exchange of knowledge and culture is desirable, while the exchange of pollutants or financial instability is undesirable. Population growth also places stresses on the planet that make one country’s problems adversely impact the welfare of other countries, thereby increasing the need for transnational cooperation. For instance, deforested hillsides in one country may result in flooding or climate change in a neighboring country. Civil conflict in one country may create refugee flows that affect neighboring countries. With huge daily flows of financial capital, countries’ economies and fortunes are closely interdependent.

Transnational cooperation or the action by two or more sovereign countries to promote their common good has seen both successes and failures in recent decades. Thus far, actions to check climate change, resulting from atmospheric accumulation of greenhouse gases, have been a cooperation failure despite some hopeful signs at the December 2014 meeting of the Conference of Parties to the Kyoto Protocol in Lima, Peru. The eradication of smallpox in 1979 and the near eradication of polio are clear transnational cooperation successes. The allocation of geostationary orbital slots and electromagnetic spectrum frequencies to satellites is another transnational cooperation success. Other such successes include deployment of tsunami early-warning systems, regulation of air corridors for commercial flights, a universal set of weights and measures, creation of the United Nations, deployment of effective peacekeeping operations, and the reduction in ozonelayer-depleting substances. So the big question for this book is what factors . . .

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