Print News and Raise Hell: The Daily Tar Heel and the Evolution of a Modern University

Print News and Raise Hell: The Daily Tar Heel and the Evolution of a Modern University

Print News and Raise Hell: The Daily Tar Heel and the Evolution of a Modern University

Print News and Raise Hell: The Daily Tar Heel and the Evolution of a Modern University

Synopsis

For over 125 years, the Daily Tar Heel has chronicled life at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and at times pushed and prodded the university community on issues of local, state, and national significance. Thousands of students have served on its staff, many of whom have gone on to prominent careers in journalism and other influential fields. Print News and Raise Hell engagingly narrates the story of the newspaper's development and the contributions of many of the people associated with it. Kenneth Joel Zogry shows how the paper has wrestled over the years with challenges to academic freedom, freedom of speech, and freedom of the press, while confronting issues such as the evolution of race, gender, and sexual equality on campus and long-standing concerns about the role of major athletics at an institution of higher learning. The story of the paper, the social media platform of its day, uncovers many dramatic but perhaps forgotten events at UNC since the late nineteenth century, and along with many photographs and cartoons not published for decades, opens a fascinating window into Tar Heel history. Examining how the campus and the paper have dealt with many challenging issues for more than a century, Zogry reveals the ways in which the history of the Daily Tar Heel is deeply intertwined with the past and present of the nation's oldest public university.

Excerpt

The Daily Tar Heel is the university’s gyroscope.

—Bill Friday

In the year before his death at the age of ninetytwo, Bill Friday sat down with me twice for interviews for this book. Because of his long and legendary career with the University of North Carolina system, Friday knew and worked with almost all of the Daily Tar Heel (dth) editors and many other staff members over a remarkable five decades—almost half the paper’s life—from the time he became Dean of Men at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) in 1948, through his tenure as system president (1956–86), and then until his retirement as president of the William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust (1986–96). Friday’s longevity and his understanding of college journalism (he served as sports editor of the Technician while an undergraduate at North Carolina State University) placed him in a unique position to reflect on the significance of the dth. in his opinion, one of the most important contributions the student newspaper has made over the decades has been to “shine a bright light into the dark corners of the university, and, when necessary, hold it accountable.” Friday deemed the dth, past and present, a “first-rate” publication and referred to it as “the university’s gyroscope.” According to Merriam-Webster, a gyroscope is a “device used to maintain orientation during motion,” an apt metaphor to describe a periodical that has both chronicled events at unc and helped influence the direction of the evolving university since 1893. in researching and writing this book, I was encouraged by Friday to take a broad view of the paper’s role on campus and across the state, advice I’ve followed.

“News is the first rough draft of history,” according to an oft-repeated quotation dating back more than a century. the Daily Tar Heel—which . . .

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