Globalizing Music Education: A Framework

Globalizing Music Education: A Framework

Globalizing Music Education: A Framework

Globalizing Music Education: A Framework

Synopsis

How do globalization and internationalization impact music education around the world? By acknowledging different cultural values and priorities, Alexandra Kertz-Welzel's vision challenges the current state of international music education and higher education, which has been dominated by English-language scholarship. Her framework utilizes an interdisciplinary approach and emphasizes the need for developing a pluralistic mode of thinking, while underlining shared foundations and goals. She explores issues of educational transfer, differences in academic discourses worldwide, and the concept of the global mindset to help facilitate much-needed transformations in global music education. This thinking and research, she argues, provides a means for better understanding global transfers of knowledge and ways to avoid culturally and linguistically hegemonic standards. Globalizing Music Education: A Framework is a timely call to action for a more conscious internationalization of music education in which everyone can play a part.

Excerpt

Globalization and internationalization have shaped our lives in ways that we do not notice anymore: the same food or fashion chains in cities worldwide, the same songs wherever we go, similar architecture in different parts of the world. Even though there usually is a touch of local flavor in everything we encounter, the international commonalities are striking. But we also know other facets of globalization and internationalization: the global reality of violence and terror by fanatic international networks, related to ideologies or religious beliefs, threatening our world order and democratic principles; the exploitation of people and resources; or the fear and rejection of globalization and internationalization, because people feel threatened by immigrants and the global economy. These and many more aspects indicate that globalization and internationalization are multifaceted and challenging, shaping lives worldwide. No matter what we think about these developments, we should face that we live in a global world, where everything and everybody is interconnected.

There are certainly various ways of encountering globalization and internationalization, publicly and individually. in the public sphere, regarding global politics or economy, international organizations such as the United Nations (UN), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), or the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) stand for a global world order. Likewise, there are representatives of internationalization in specialized fields, such as International Music Council (IMC) or International Society for Music Education (ISME). But globalization and internationalization are also present in personal histories. People studying, working, or living abroad encounter the challenges and opportunities of globalization and internationalization, which shape their professional and private identities.

These personal experiences have been the starting point for this book. I spent three and a half years, from 2002 until 2005, as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. As someone who had never encountered music education in any other than the German context, I faced personal and professional struggles. Realizing that I was not the only one facing these problems eventually led to the decision to turn these challenges affecting my professional identity into a research project, investigating them from a scholarly and interdisciplinary perspective. This book is the result of this personal and . . .

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