Personal Property Law

Personal Property Law

Personal Property Law

Personal Property Law

Synopsis

What type of right is a property right? How are items of property classified for legal purposes? In this revised edition of Personal Property Law, Michael Bridge provides answers to these fundamental questions of property law. His critical analysis includes new material on insolvency, in particular the anti-deprivation principle and the pari passu rule, as well as comprehensive accounts of recent case law (OBG v Allan, Yearworth, and Datastream,) and statutory developments. Widely considered to be the best short introduction to English personal property law, Bridge constructs an authoritative and systematic summary of this complex field for readers approaching the subject for the first time. It focuses on the acquisition, loss, transfer, and protection of interests in personal property law, and specific topics include: ownership and possession; treatment of the separate contributions of the common law and equity to modern personal property law; discussion of modes of transfer; the means of protecting property interests; the resolution of disputes concerning title to personal property; the grant of security interests, and the issues arising out of the transformation and mixing of tangible personal property.

Excerpt

The subject of personal property law, long neglected, has attracted increasing attention in recent years. It is no exaggeration to say that it is claiming its rightful place in the legal literature. Many changes in the law have occurred since the last edition in 2002, so a very substantial measure of updating has been necessary. in addition, extensive additions have been made in the coverage of the book. the introduction to the subject in the opening chapter has been significantly enhanced so as to allow a fuller discussion of the nature of property. There is more material on money and on body parts as property. the discussion of possession has been expanded, particularly when it comes to constructive possession. There is an extended analytical treatment of bailment. Throughout the book there is now a fuller treatment of equity and there is also a fuller discussion of tracing. New material has been introduced on knowing receipt and dishonest assistance. Greater attention is paid to the disposition of equitable interests and to the equity of rescission. Security interests now receive a fuller treatment.

A consequence of the expansion of the book is that the order of the material has been changed in parts and there are now eight chapters instead of seven. Although this fourth edition is somewhat longer than the third, the aim of the book, to encompass the vast subject of personal property law in an economical and readable form, has not changed.

London 4 January 2015 . . .

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