From Good Intentions to Good Practice: Mapping Services Working with Families Where There Is Domestic Violence

From Good Intentions to Good Practice: Mapping Services Working with Families Where There Is Domestic Violence

From Good Intentions to Good Practice: Mapping Services Working with Families Where There Is Domestic Violence

From Good Intentions to Good Practice: Mapping Services Working with Families Where There Is Domestic Violence

Synopsis

In recent years, there has been rapid proliferation of services for women and children in situations of domestic violence; however, there are many gaps and inconsistencies in service provision. This research aimed to establish the range and extent of services across the UK for families where there is domestic violence; to identify innovative work and thus develop a framework for good practice.From good intentions to good practice looks at provision and practice across a range of services with regard to: inter-agency working; definitions and guidelines; staff training; safety issues; monitoring and screening; evaluation; funding. The report provides an extensive framework for good practice in working with families where there is domestic violence and highlights recommendations for policy development.From good intentions to good practice is essential reading for all agencies working with families, particularly, Women's Aid, women's refuges, organisations concerned with children's welfare, social services and perpetrator programmes, as well as policy makers, researchers and anyone interested in issues of domestic violence and family policy.

Excerpt

The seven case studies that follow illustrate innovative practice in a range of settings. Each project shows some, although not all, of the good practice indicators and most have yet to be evaluated.

Case Study 1: Imani: This project is supported by nch Action for Children. It is an example of a community
development and women’s empowerment project in an urban milieu, developing good practice with women and
children from minority ethnic communities.

Case Study 2: Wyrley Birch Centre for Parents and Children: This project is operated by the Children’s Society,
and provides an example of a family support project in which particular attention is paid to children’s needs and
voices.

Case Study 3: Domestic Violence Outreach Scheme, Northern Ireland: This is a Barnardo’s project in Northern
Ireland and demonstrates a particular emphasis on safety planning, children’s work and women’s groups.

Case Study 4: Hayle Family Support Project: This centres on a joint project between the nspcc and the local
refuge, and is included as an example of a rural project offering a family support setting.

Case Study 5: Hereford Women’s Aid: This is a Women’s Aid refuge and outreach project, included as an example
of a provider of safe, confidential accommodation and services, and a key player in local multi-agency coordination.

Case Studies 6 and 7: Fife and the London Borough of Newham: Both Fife and Newham are included as
examples of statutory authorities where large amounts of local inter-agency work are occurring, and which
feature, in varying ways, innovative practice, a preventative approach and user involvement.

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