Managing Water for Peace in the Middle East: Alternative Strategies

Managing Water for Peace in the Middle East: Alternative Strategies

Managing Water for Peace in the Middle East: Alternative Strategies

Managing Water for Peace in the Middle East: Alternative Strategies

Synopsis

The author highlights the economic and environmental gains of co-generation applications and the political, economic, and technical viability of the strategic use of such sources as brackish water, seawater, and reclaimed waste water. A variety of alternatives for the transboundary transport of water are also detailed. The book features a plan for the joint development of the Jordan River, the Dead Sea, and the Aqaba region.

Excerpt

Limitations on water, one of the scarcest resources in an arid region, are likely to have a significant impact on the economic development of all countries of the Middle East. Middle East water-resource issues are also likely to have a significant impact on the future political framework of the region in the aftermath of the Gulf war of 1990–91 and the peace agreements between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization of September 1993 and Israel and Jordan of October 1994. the scarcity of water and the high cost of its development have long been recognized in arid regions, especially in the Arabian Gulf countries, where neither surface water nor renewable fresh groundwater are available. the demand for water to serve expanding thirdworld populations continues to increase, however, while fresh-water supplies are finite, and it is becoming more and more difficult to develop them on a renewable basis. Almost all fresh and renewable waters such as rivers, streams, lakes, and groundwater, which are termed “conventional water” or “traditional water,” have already been exploited or will be fully developed in the countries of the Middle East and North Africa by the end of this century.

Few regions of the planet offer a more varied physiography or a . . .

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