Shakespeare and the Mediterranean: The Selected Proceedings of the International Shakespeare Association World Congress, Valencia, 2001

Shakespeare and the Mediterranean: The Selected Proceedings of the International Shakespeare Association World Congress, Valencia, 2001

Shakespeare and the Mediterranean: The Selected Proceedings of the International Shakespeare Association World Congress, Valencia, 2001

Shakespeare and the Mediterranean: The Selected Proceedings of the International Shakespeare Association World Congress, Valencia, 2001

Synopsis

Shakespeare's career-long fascination with the Mediterranean made the association a natural one for this first World Shakespeare Congress of the Third Millennium. The plenary lectures and selected papers in this volume represent some of the best contemporary thought and writing on Shakespeare, in the ranging plenary lectures by Jonathan Bate on Shakespeare's islands and the Muslim connection, Michael Coveney's on the late Sir John Gielgud, Robert Ellrodt's on Shakespeare's sonnets and Montaigne's essays, Stephen Orgel's on Shakespeare's own Shylock, and Marina Warner's on Shakespeare's fairy-tale uses of magic. Also included in the volume's several sections are original pagers selected from special sessions and seminars by other distinguished writers, including Jean E. Howard, Gary Taylor, and Richard Wilson. Tom Clayton is Regents' Professor of English Language and Literature and chair of the Classical Civilization Program at the University of Minnesota. Susan Brock is Head of Library and Information Resources at the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust in Stratford-upon-Avon and Honorary Fellow of the Shakespeare Institute of the University of Birmingham. Vicente Fores is Associate Profe

Excerpt

In an essay published for the occasion in April 2001, giorgio MELCHIori asks, “Why choose Valencia as the venue of a World Shakespeare Conference?” the question proves rhetorical because “the reply is obvious: in the first place Valencia is a most hospitable city, an ideal setting for any conference on any subject in the world, because of its location, its climate, the mere beauty of the place” (“The Valencian Connection,” 1). a perfect match for the theme of the seventh World Shakespeare Congress, “Shakespeare and the Mediterranean,” Valencia hosted over 500 delegates from more than thirty countries.

The social and cultural program for the Congress took full advantage of its site. Ranging through the arts, it included Spanish versions and adaptations of Shakespearean plays (Much Ado About Nothing, The Merchant of Venice, and King Lear); an exhibition titled “Thirty Years of Shakespeare Translations in Spain”; honoria in cyberspazio, an opera based on a text by Madelyn Starbuck and presented by Carles Padrissa and Vicente Forés; and a performance scripted from the work of Valencian poet Ausiàs March. the Congress was timed to conclude on 23 April, a date coinciding not only with Shakespeare’s birthday but also with the feast of San Vicente, patron saint of Valencia. As a result, visitors had an opportunity to see the city mount a religious celebration, the streets filled with colorful processions and various spaces offering miracle plays enacted by citizens of all ages. There were optional tours through Valencia and its environs, providing additional access to such places as the city’s museums and cathedral, the monastery of Puig, the castle and theater of Sagunto.

While making the most of its venue, the social and cultural program extended beyond it with performances illustrating conventions of Italian theater and music, and with screenings of several American and British films. It complemented the rich and diversified academic program of fortythree papers and thirty-two seminars. Appearing in this volume, the five plenary papers by Jonathan Bate, Michael Coveney, Robert Ellrodt, Stephen Orgel, and Marina Warner explore topics from Shakespeare’s islands and magic to the ambivalence of Shylock to correspondences between Shakespeare and Montaigne. Comparable to their subjects, the backgrounds of these speakers—distinguished scholarship, theater criticism . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.