Communications Media, Globalization and Empire

Communications Media, Globalization and Empire

Communications Media, Globalization and Empire

Communications Media, Globalization and Empire

Synopsis

In Communications Media, Globalization, and Empire, an international team of experts analyze and critique the political economy of media communications worldwide. Their analysis takes particular account of the sometimes conflicting pressures of globalization and "neo-imperialism." The first is commonly defined as the dismantling of barriers to trade and cultural exchange and responds significantly to lobbying of the world’s largest corporations, including media corporations. The second concerns U.S. pursuit of national security interests as response to "terrorism," at one level and, at others, to intensifying competition among both nations and corporations for global natural resources.

Excerpt

The idea for this book originated during a 2002 conference that took place in Spokane and was inspired and organized by Professor David Demers for the University of Washington’s Center for Global Media Studies. David subsequently edited the conference proceedings (Terrorism, Globalization and Mass Communication, Spokane: Marquette). My contacts with several of the participants in that conference inspired the present volume. To their number I have found others who helped to provide an even richer array of perspectives on globalization, media and empire than might otherwise have been possible. in this book, contributors have tried to unpack many of the under-theorized issues concerning the relationships between communications media and the processes that are commonly described as “globalization”. My discussions with contributors have also sought to foreground the changing context of globalization studies in the wake of “9/11”. This event triggered a new phase, among other things, in the struggle of the United States for maintenance of economic, political and military hegemony in the face of intense struggles around the world for the redress of historical grievances; political, economic and cultural autonomy; and scarce resources. and all these have significant implications for the role of communications media and perceptions of them.

I have many people to thank for helping this project along the way. First, of course, I must express my gratitude to the contributors themselves, who bore with the project for almost three years before it was ready to submit to the publisher. I greatly appreciate the support that John Libbey and his series editor, Manuel Alvarado, have provided, not least by their decision to adopt this volume for inclusion in what I consider to be a ground-breaking, intensely scholarly series of media titles that John and Manuel have accomplished over the past two decades. I recall with great fondness my faculty colleagues as well as students at the Department of Communication at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona and I thank them for providing me with an environment of incredible trust and encouragement during a deeply disturbing period of us and world history. the book was completed after I left Pomona to . . .

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