The History of Chile

The History of Chile

The History of Chile

The History of Chile

Synopsis

This book provides an up-to-date historical overview of this complex and fascinating country. Beginning with a survey of the land, people, and current government, the book then traces Chile's chronological story. Ten chapters detail Chilean history from the indigenous peoples to the democratic transition after the Pinochet dictatorship.

Chile is more than 2,600 miles long but averages a width of only 110 miles. It contains the driest desert in the world, the highest mountain range in the hemisphere, temperate rainforests, and a piece of Antarctica. In all of these areas, Chileans have fashioned unique communities and, together, a vibrant nation. Chile's history mirrors its geographical variety. From its pre-colonial period to its days as a Spanish colony and its many independent governments, Chile has long been a land of crises and controversy. Yet it is also a land filled with valuable resources--most famously copper--that have yielded great wealth.

The History of Chile provides an up-to-date historical overview of this complex and fascinating country. Beginning with a survey of the land, people, and current government, the book then traces Chile's chronological story. Ten chapters detail Chilean history from the indigenous peoples to the democratic transition after the Pinochet dictatorship. Also included are biographical sketches of notable persons in Chilean history, a glossary of selected terms, and a bibliographical essay that discusses the best sources for further reading. This is the perfect starting point for students and general readers interested in the history and people of Chile.

Excerpt

The Greenwood Histories of the Modern Nations series is intended to provide students and interested laypeople with up-to-date, concise, and analytical histories of many of the nations of the contemporary world. Not since the 1960s has there been a systematic attempt to publish a series of national histories, and, as editors, we believe that this series will prove to be a valuable contribution to our understanding of other countries in our increasingly interdependent world.

Over thirty years ago, at the end of the 1960s, the Cold War was an accepted reality of global politics, the process of decolonization was still in progress, the idea of a unified Europe with a single currency was unheard of, the United States was mired in a war in Vietnam, and the economic boom of Asia was still years in the future. Richard Nixon was president of the United States, Mao Tse-tung (not yet Mao Zedong) ruled China, Leonid Brezhnev guided the Soviet Union, and Harold Wilson was prime minister of the United Kingdom. Authoritarian dictators still ruled most of Latin America, the Middle East was reeling in the wake of the Six-Day War, and Shah Reza Pahlavi was at the height of his power in Iran. Clearly, the past thirty years have been witness to a great deal of historical change, and it is to this change that this series is primarily addressed.

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