Beyond Good and Evil

Beyond Good and Evil

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Beyond Good and Evil

Beyond Good and Evil

Read FREE!

Excerpt

No philosopher since Kant has left so undeniable an imprint on modern thought as has Friedrich Nietzsche. Even Schopenhauer, whose influence colored the greater part of Europe, made no such widespread impression. Not only in ethics and literature do we find the moulding hand of Nietzsche at work, invigorating and solidifying; but in pedagogics’and in art, in politics and religion, the influence of his doctrines is to be encountered.

The facts relating to Nietzsche’s life are few and simple. He was born at Röcken, a little village in the Prussian province of Saxony, on October 15, 1844; and it is an interesting paradox that this most terrible and devastating critic of Christianity and its ideals, was the culmination of two long collateral lines of theologians. There were two other children in the Nietzsche household—a girl born in 1846, and a son born in 1850. the girl was named Therese Elizabeth Alexandra, and afterward she became the philosopher’s closest companion and guardian and his most voluminous biographer. the boy, Joseph, did not survive his first year. When Nietzsche’s father died the family moved to Naumburg; and Friedrich, then only six years old, was sent to a local Municipal Boys’ School. Later he was withdrawn and entered in a private institution which prepared the younger students for the Cathedral Grammar School. After a few years here Nietzsche successfully passed his examinations for the well-known Landes-Schule at Pforta, where he remained until 1864, enrolling the following term at the University of Bonn.

It was at Bonn that a decided change came over his religious views; and it was here also that his great friendship for Friedrich Wilhelm Ritschl, the philologist, developed. When Ritschl was transferred to the University of Leipzig, Nietzsche followed him. Leipzig was the turning-point of his life. Here he met Wagner; became acquainted with Erwin Rohde; and discovered Schopenhauer. An interest . . .

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