The Literary Digest History of the World War: Compiled from Original and Contemporary Sources: American, British, French, German, and Others - Vol. 5

The Literary Digest History of the World War: Compiled from Original and Contemporary Sources: American, British, French, German, and Others - Vol. 5

Read FREE!

The Literary Digest History of the World War: Compiled from Original and Contemporary Sources: American, British, French, German, and Others - Vol. 5

The Literary Digest History of the World War: Compiled from Original and Contemporary Sources: American, British, French, German, and Others - Vol. 5

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Exactly twenty-five months after the Germans began their attack on Verdun (in February, 1916), and more than three and a half months after a chorus of German newspapers first announced the coming of a great drive in the west —an announcement which they repeated twice afterward as part of their efforts by threats to force the Entente to make peace with them—and when all their peace threats had failed, the thunder of German guns in northern France on March 21, 1918, deepened into a tempest of fire along the British front and began the greatest battle of the war, extending over a front of fifty miles. Special preparations for the drive had been in progress in the German army for about two months, or since the first week in February, when all peace bids having failed, orders for it by the German commanders were definitely issued. This order went forth immediately after the Supreme War Council of the Entente, on February 2, had decided at Versailles that the war would be prosecuted “until such times as the pressure of the effort shall have brought about, in the enemy governments and peoples, a change of temper which would justify the hope of the conclusion of peace on terms which would not involve the abandonment, in the face of aggressive and unrepentant militarism, of all the principles of freedom, justice, and respect for the law of nations, which the Allies are resolved to vindicate.”

The Council had been unable to find in the Teutonic peace terms “any real approximation to the moderate conditions laid down by the Allied Governments.” Its conviction on this point had been deepened “by the impression made

Statement made by General Ludendorff to the Cologne Volkszeitung seven days after the advance began.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.