The Literary Digest History of the World War: Compiled from Original and Contemporary Sources: American, British, French, German, and Others - Vol. 6

The Literary Digest History of the World War: Compiled from Original and Contemporary Sources: American, British, French, German, and Others - Vol. 6

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The Literary Digest History of the World War: Compiled from Original and Contemporary Sources: American, British, French, German, and Others - Vol. 6

The Literary Digest History of the World War: Compiled from Original and Contemporary Sources: American, British, French, German, and Others - Vol. 6

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Meanwhile, following the American success in the St. Mihiel salient, British and French veterans on September 17 began another drive in the north against the Hindenburg line in the St. Quentin sector. Sweeping forward on a front of twenty-two miles, they advanced from one and one-third to three miles. the most important aspect of the advance was that it made more certain the eventual capture of St. Quentin which the Germans had been ordered to hold at all costs. As that city had been virtually surrounded on three sides, its fall seemed now only a matter of several days or a few weeks at most: a British assault on a front of sixteen miles from Holnon, west of St. Quentin, to Gouzeaucourt, reached a depth of more than three miles at some points and secured 6,000 prisoners. the blow went far toward wiping out the only remaining bulge that resembled a salient.

The French advance was less spectacular, but equally successful in gaining objectives on a front of six miles, reaching an average depth of one and one-third miles, and adding several hundred prisoners to the record. the French were now less than three miles from the suburbs of St. Quentin. This city, where German troops in 1871 under General Goeben had scored a great victory, was one of the buttresses of the Douai-St. Quentin-Laon line. With the French on the outskirts of La Fère, St. Quentin invested, and with the British battling doggedly for Cambrai, the great Hindenburg system was in danger of being breached at three of its strongest points. Once ousted from it, the Teutons would . . .

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