My Prisons (I Mie Prigioni) and Francesca da Rimini, a Tragedy in Five Acts

My Prisons (I Mie Prigioni) and Francesca da Rimini, a Tragedy in Five Acts

Read FREE!

My Prisons (I Mie Prigioni) and Francesca da Rimini, a Tragedy in Five Acts

My Prisons (I Mie Prigioni) and Francesca da Rimini, a Tragedy in Five Acts

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Readers of the present generation, to whom are presented frequent pictures of the crimes of Russian absolutism, probably think of the Czar’s government as unique in modern times. But within the memory of persons now living Austria was an absolute monarchy, displaying the usual insolence and cruelty of despotism. the fair plains of northern Italy were under foreign domination before Cavour and Garibaldi secured for their compatriots a free and united country. Veneria especially was under the Austrian yoke. in 1818 Byron wrote:

“The Suabian sued, and now the Austrian reigns—
  An emperor tramples where an emperor knelt.”

The prisons were full of political offenders, arrested without warrant and detained without trial, suffering horrors quite equal to those of Siberia. the Carbonari was a secret political organization in Italy, which arose about 1810, and became powerful and well known about 1818. It took its name, which signifies “charcoal burners,” from the circumstance that it had adopted charcoal as a symbol, signifying purification. Its motto was “Revenge upon the wolves that devour the lambs.” the organization in 1820 had about seven hundred thousand members, in all parts of the country, many of whom were of high social rank. They not only hoped to put an end to foreign domination, but were strongly inclined . . .

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