The Decline of the I. W. W

The Decline of the I. W. W

The Decline of the I. W. W

The Decline of the I. W. W

Excerpt

The history of the I. W. W. until 1917 has been told so often that only a few words are needed to remind the reader of the events which made the organization a well-known revolutionary industrial union at the time of the great war.

The spirit of industrial unionism was expressed in England nearly one hundred years ago, under the inspiration of Robert Owen. Some sixty years ago, in America, the Knights of Labor attempted to unite the unskilled as well as the skilled.

In 1905, delegates from forty-three labor organizations met in Chicago to form a new, all-inclusive organization, founded upon the principles of revolutionary industrial unionism. It was to be known as the Industrial Workers of the World. The right wing of the organization soon withdrew. In 1908 the political actionists withdrew; and the organization was now "an organization of the unskilled and very conspicuously of the migratory and frequently jobless unskilled."

Since the migratory worker does not vote it is easy to see that "political action" seems to him inadequate. The con-

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.