San Francisco's Literary Frontier

San Francisco's Literary Frontier

San Francisco's Literary Frontier

San Francisco's Literary Frontier

Excerpt

The Golden Era appeared a day early that week so that its issue would commemorate the driving of the spike which would mark the completion of the transcontinental railroad. On Saturday, May 8th, 1869, San Francisco was buzzing with excitement, making her preparations for "the greatest and brightest day" in her annals. Plans were completed for the longest parade in the history of that parade-loving city. The guns at Fort Point were loaded and primed -- set to volley when the big moment arrived. Bells were rigged up to peal when the momentous taps were transmitted over the telegraph from Nevada. Judge Nathaniel Bennett, orator of the occasion, was rehearsing his speech, ready to deliver it to the portion of the crowd that would be able to elbow its way into the Mechanics Pavilion, the largest hall in the city. The honorable Frank Soulé was prepared to declaim the poem of the day. The Reverend Dr. Cox had memorized his invocation.

Then came the news that the train bringing the delegation of the Union Pacific to the end of the track in Nevada had been delayed by floods and creditors and that the East would hold up the West for two more days. For a moment San Francisco . . .

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