The History of Germany: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time - Vol. 2

The History of Germany: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time - Vol. 2

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The History of Germany: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time - Vol. 2

The History of Germany: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time - Vol. 2

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The news of the emperor's death was received with exultation by the pontiff: "Let the heavens rejoice, and let the earth be glad." With insolent triumph he wrote to the city of Naples, declaring that he took her forthwith into his possession, and that she should never again be under the control of a temporal sovereign. He also declared the Hohenstaufen to have forfeited their right upon Apulia and Sicily, and even upon Swabia. The Alemannic princes made a lavish use of the freedom from all restraint granted to them by the pope. The Alpine nobles became equally lawless. Baso, bishop of Sion, a papal partisan, whom William of Holland had empowered to confiscate the lands of the Ghibellines, countenancing the tyranny exercised by Mangipan, lord of Mörill, over the Valais peasantry, they applied for aid to Peter, earl of Savoy, by whom he was humbled [A. D. 1251]. In 1255, the Ghibelline bishop, Henry of Coire, took the field against the Rhætian dynasts, who discovered equal insolence, and defeated them and their allies, the Lombard Guelphs, at Enns. The imperial cause was sustained in Upper Italy by Ezzelino, in Lower Italy by Manfred. This prince, Enzio's rival in talent, valour, and beauty, was a son of the emperor by mistress Blanca Lancia, whom he afterwards married. Born and educated in Italy, he was the idol of his countrymen, and as prince of Tarento, was by no means a despicable antagonist to the pope.

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