The Golden Grove: Selected Passages from the Sermons and Writings of Jeremy Taylor

The Golden Grove: Selected Passages from the Sermons and Writings of Jeremy Taylor

The Golden Grove: Selected Passages from the Sermons and Writings of Jeremy Taylor

The Golden Grove: Selected Passages from the Sermons and Writings of Jeremy Taylor

Excerpt

Our Romantic critics, Coleridge and Lamb and Hazlitt, rendered an important service to English letters by their re-discovery of many old English writers who had fallen out of fashion. They saw, however, these favourites of theirs, these old divines and dramatists, looming somewhat larger than life in the misty past, and often praised them with more zeal than cool discrimination. There is no one perhaps whose fame has been more affected by this splendid injustice than that seventeenth-century prelate and controversial writer, Jeremy Taylor. Coleridge, to whom he was an object of almost unbounded admiration, extolled his 'great and lovely mind'; and comparing him more than once with Shakespeare, placed him with Shakespeare and Milton and Bacon among the four great geniuses of our older literature.

Coleridge inspired Charles Lamb, as Lamb tells us in one of his letters, with this 'LOVE of Jeremy Taylor', which led him to declare that Taylor 'has more and more beautiful imagery, . . . more knowledge and description of human life and manners than any prose book in the language: he has more delicacy and sweetness than any mortal the "gentle" Shakespeare hardly excepted'. Hazlitt equalled . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.