Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster and America

Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster and America

Read FREE!

Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster and America

Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster and America

Read FREE!

Synopsis

The following pages attempt for the first time a systematic treatment of the beginning of a migration of settlers of Scotch and English descent from the north of Ireland to the New World. Parker, Perry, Green, Hanna and other writers have collected much of general history and tradition; and they have so pictured the Scotch traits developed under Irish skies, that Scotch Irish blood, once a reproach, is now cause for pride. But the conditions in Ireland before the migration, the voyage across the ocean, the emigrants as they appeared to early observers -- these phases of the story have now for the first time been treated in detail, drawing upon hitherto unexplored sources. If a large part of our American population traces back to Ulster, the early religious, political and economic life of the valleys of the Foyle and the Bann should interest many, for many, whether they are aware of it or not, are descended from the Scotch Irish. Clergymen and statesmen have from generation to generation extolled the rugged virtues of these pioneers, and a closer study of their lives will, it is hoped, deepen the hold which they already have upon our affections.

There has been a constant temptation to include in this study some account of emigrants from the west of Scotland; they had very much in common with their Ulster friends and kinsmen. But however desirable a wide scope may be, it has been my purpose here to include only those who were influenced by the peculiar environment of a life upon Irish soil.

Excerpt

On the map of Ireland the province of Ulster gathers into a circle nearly a quarter of the territory of the island. Its southerly bound runs from Donegal Bay on the west to Carlingford Bay on the east. In the centre of Ulster lies County Tyrone, with the counties of Donegal, Londonderry, and Antrim along its northern borders to fend the sea. This is the heart of the Scotch Irish country. South of County Tyrone are Fermanagh, Monaghan, and Ar- magh, counties not so closely associated with early Protestant migration. South of Monaghan, bordering the Roman Catholic province of Leinster, is Cavan, and to the east, touching Armagh, lies County Down whose shores are less than a dozen miles from Ayrshire in Scotland.

Donegal and. Tyrone are drained by the Finn and the Mourne, two rivers which unite at Strabane to form the Foyle. The Foyle flows northward across Londonderry to the sea. From Lough Neagh on the eastern border of Tyrone the Bann flows north also . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.