Cricket Nurseries of Colonial Barbados: The Elite Schools, 1865-1966

Cricket Nurseries of Colonial Barbados: The Elite Schools, 1865-1966

Cricket Nurseries of Colonial Barbados: The Elite Schools, 1865-1966

Cricket Nurseries of Colonial Barbados: The Elite Schools, 1865-1966

Excerpt

This book is the natural offspring of three articles published recently in Cricket Lore on the contribution to Barbadian cricket made by the three oldest and most important secondary schools in that island. These essays have been updated and considerably expanded. The chapter on Combermere is, in large part, a repetition of the text for the magazine on Combermerian cricket which that school had planned to publish (but eventually did not) as part of the celebrations of its three-hundredth anniversary in 1995. A lengthy chapter is presented here on cricket in Barbados to provide a broader context for those chapters on Combermere, Harrison College and the Lodge School. This is, in essence, a reworking of items already published in Banja: A Magazine of Barbadian Life & Culture and the Canadian Journal of History. The epilogue is mainly an attempt to suggest ways in which the rich cricketing tradition in Barbados may be maintained.

Altogether, the story of Barbadian cricket remains an epic. I still marvel at the thought that such a small community could have done so well in any discipline for such a long time, notwithstanding its relative paucity of men and money. On the cricket field, Barbados could have challenged any nation on even terms for most of the period since World War II. Few other communities can make that boast. Perhaps New South Wales during the 1950s might have done reasonably well against the full might of England or even the combined remainder of Australia. In that same decade, too, Surrey, under Stuart Surridge and Peter May, could probably have done the same. But neither of those teams remained so consistently powerful for more than a decade. They suffered the normal consequences of periodic reconstruction. Barbados always seemed capable of replacing its veteran stars with younger lions, eager to demonstrate their equality with the rest of the world.

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