The Conspiracy of Pontiac and the Indian War after the Conquest of Canada - Vol. 2

The Conspiracy of Pontiac and the Indian War after the Conquest of Canada - Vol. 2

The Conspiracy of Pontiac and the Indian War after the Conquest of Canada - Vol. 2

The Conspiracy of Pontiac and the Indian War after the Conquest of Canada - Vol. 2

Synopsis

The Conspiracy of Pontiac is an account of the Indian wars that occurred on the Appalachian frontier, extending from western Virginia to what is now Wisconsin and Michigan, in 1763-65.

Excerpt

By Michael N. McConnell

Francis Parkman Conspiracy of Pontiac is a history of one of the biggest and costliest wars in colonial America. In 1763 and 1764 Indian and British forces collided in a struggle to determine who would decide the future of the Great Lakes region and the Ohio Valley. A stunning series of Indian victories in the summer of 1763 all but swept the British from the West. By the end of the following year, however, the war sputtered out in a series of local truces and was officially ended in 1765 in treaties that allowed the two sides to maintain a fragile peace until the American Revolution once more brought turmoil and bloodshed to the West.

There was no lack of high drama during the war: Major Henry Gladwin's defiant stand at Detroit, the battle at Bushy Run, the atrocities committed by the Paxton Boys at Conestoga. Parkman took full advantage of his material and his own impressive narrative skills to produce an account that became one of the earliest studies of American frontier history and one that shaped subsequent understanding of the war as a pivotal event in late colonial history.

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