Labor in Developing Economies

Labor in Developing Economies

Labor in Developing Economies

Labor in Developing Economies

Excerpt

During the past eight years, the Institute of Industrial Relations has participated in the Inter-University Study of Labor Problems in Economic Development, which has been supported by a generous grant from the Ford Foundation and more recently by a second grant from the Carnegie Corporation. Conducted in coöperation with industrial relations centers at Harvard, Princeton, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Chicago, the project has been directed by Clark Kerr, John T. Dunlop, Frederick H. Harbison, and Charles A. Myers. Their book, Industrialism and Industrial Man (1960), includes a list of all the participants in the project and of the numerous publications that have resulted from it.

Included in the plans for the Inter-University Study from an early stage was the preparation of two volumes of essays on the labor movement and industrial relations in selected countries, to be edited by Walter Galenson. Although the more highly industrialized countries were, for the most part, to be excluded, the essays were to deal with countries in various stages of industrialization. An effort was made to include a large enough group of relatively underdeveloped countries to provide a wide range of illustrations of patterns of labor relations likely to emerge in the course of economic development. Another important consideration in the selection of countries was the availability of experts who had acquired substantial firsthand knowledge of their respective countries or areas.

The first or the two volumes, Labor and Economic Development (published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1959), included chapters on India, Japan, Egypt, French West Africa, and the British West Indies.

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