Russia on the Way: By Harrison Salisbury

Russia on the Way: By Harrison Salisbury

Russia on the Way: By Harrison Salisbury

Russia on the Way: By Harrison Salisbury

Excerpt

When I boarded a plane in Moscow, taking the long way home through India, Australia and the Pacific, I had been in Russia eight months. It had been a good time for seeing that country--how good I did not realize until I could view it in retrospect. On the long plane trip home, the thousands of sweltering miles across Persia, up and down India, across Australia, New Guinea and the blue spaces of the Pacific, there was time to think. And in America there has been time, also.

I went to Russia at a good moment.

Tehran was just finished. In the Russia I saw, the worst of the war was over. True, there were heavy battles ahead, and many lives would be lost before the war was won. The Russians had still to blast the Germans from the Ukraine. Leningrad had yet to shake loose the iron grip of the encircling German forts, and the Nazis sat warm and secure within White Russia. Even the Crimea was a Nazi rest camp. But by now Russia knew that the war would be won.

No longer did Russians speak of Moscow and Stalingrad and Leningrad with almost religious awe, only half able to believe what they had done there. By now the Russians I met knew that Germany had been beaten--that from here on, the way would be hard and bloody but the end was not in doubt. And they had begun to think about what this meant--the people had, I mean, because the hard-thinking analysts of the Kremlin had long before worked out logically and precisely every implication, not only of a Russian victory but of a Russian defeat. The men of the Kremlin study . . .

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