Social Legislation: American Laws Dealing with Family, Child, and Dependent

Social Legislation: American Laws Dealing with Family, Child, and Dependent

Social Legislation: American Laws Dealing with Family, Child, and Dependent

Social Legislation: American Laws Dealing with Family, Child, and Dependent

Excerpt

This book is intended to parallel those on Labor Legislation and Social Insurance. Twenty-five years ago John R. Commons, now emeritus professor at the University of Wisconsin, and John B. Andrews, Secretary of the American Association for Labor Legislation, wrote the first book on Labor Legislation designed for college students. Since then many books on labor law and social insurance have been written. Among them are several which have come from the University of Wisconsin faculty or students as: History of Labor in the United States, by Commons and associates ; The Industrial Commission of Wisconsin, by Arthur Altmeyer; and The Government in Labor Disputes, by Edwin Witte .

With the exception of Mary Callcott Principles of Social Legislation, and June Purcell Guild Living With the Law, both of which deal briefly with some of the subjects discussed in this book, no survey of the law pertaining to the family and the poor and adapted to the needs of the undergraduate social science student has appeared. A five-volume set of books on American Family Laws written by Chester G. Vernier, Professor of Law at Stanford University, has provided law and other students with an extensive summary of legislation as it pertains to Marriage, Divorce, Husband and Wife, Parent and Child, Incompetents and Dependents. From the faculty of the University of Chicago Graduate School of Social Service Administration have come several valuable books of documents on such subjects as The Family and the State, The Child and the State, Social Work and the Courts, and Public Welfare Administration. The intended reader is the graduate student expecting to enter professional social work. Extensive reference has been made to the Vernier and University of Chicago books in this volume.

This book summarizes American legislation on selected subjects, makes frequent reference to judicial decisions, and attempts to set both legislation and judicial opinion in an historical matrix. The writer regrets that sample legal cases could not be included, but space precluded. However, books of documents illustrating many of the phases of legislation and of judicial opinion discussed herein are available for supplementary reading and many educational institutions provide law libraries. Although this book involves a discussion of legislation and judicial decision, it is not the writer's intent to teach the law on any subject; that is a task for lawyers. Instead, the purpose is to show the . . .

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