Slaves Need No Leaders

Slaves Need No Leaders

Slaves Need No Leaders

Slaves Need No Leaders

Excerpt

For Americans there is something curiously unreal about this war. It is fought by American soldiers and sailors on the five continents and the seven seas. The 'battle of production' is rolling along and there is much activity on the home front. People are buying their bonds and, on the whole, submit without too much grumbling to the inconveniences caused by the war. War appropriations of a size beyond the comprehension of average men are voted in record time.

And yet there reigns an eerie twilight which conceals as much of the war as it reveals, a mental haze which does not permit us to view the import and the tragedy of this war in all its depth. There may be anger, but the depth of our feeling is not stirred. We are curiously indifferent to the suffering of the millions who are wounded and dying, we watch dispassionately and with a certain aloofness the slow death of armies of women and children robbed of the necessities of life. We are told that the outcome of this war will determine the fate of the world for centuries to come, but even as the mind accepts this fact the heart-beat does not quicken. We live from day to day, only too often oblivious of our inheritance from the past and therefore without perspective upon the future. We throw ourselves into activities which help us escape from the terror of contemporary events, into realism divorced from reality.

Americans are not alone in this unreal world. The French people failed to visualize the nature of the war until utter disaster overtook them. The British thought in terms of power politics and of the war as a game of chess, with moving armies on the board, until bombs began to . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.