A History of French Commercial Policies

A History of French Commercial Policies

A History of French Commercial Policies

A History of French Commercial Policies

Excerpt

The necessity of clearing the channels of international trade by at least a partial removal of tariff barriers and other obstructions to world commerce is probably one of the few subjects in the entire field of economics on which the authorities find themselves in general agreement. The World Economic Conference of 1927, the most representative gathering of the kind ever assembled, voiced the unanimous opinion of its members in a resolution stating that "this Conference shall . . . mark the beginning of a new era, during which international commerce will successfully overcome all obstacles in its path that unduly hamper it, and resume that general upward movement which is at once a sign of the world's economic health and the necessary condition for the development of civilization."

The views of the economists and businessmen assembled at Geneva have found strong support in the pronouncements of responsible political leaders who, from President Roosevelt to Dr. Schacht and even Adolf Hitler, have frequently proclaimed their recognition of the benefits of foreign trade and have extolled the virtue of more liberal commercial policies.

It is all the more distressing, therefore, that the trend of commercial and tariff developments since the war of 1914- 1918, and especially since the beginning of the depression of 1929, has been definitely in a direction opposite to that outlined in the resolutions of the World Economic Conference of 1927.

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