Caspar David Friedrich: His Life and Work

Caspar David Friedrich: His Life and Work

Caspar David Friedrich: His Life and Work

Caspar David Friedrich: His Life and Work

Excerpt

Recent researches in American cultural history have revealed how deeply the mystic philosophy of the German Romantic School permeated American life and thought in the second quarter of the Nineteenth Century. Emerson, Thoreau, Alcott, Channing and Bryant translated Schelling Naturphilosophie and Kant's idealism into American Transcendentalism.

But curiously enough the embodiment of the Romantic attitude towards life, as it was expressed in the fine arts, that is to say in the landscape paintings of Caspar David Friedrich, escaped the attention of the poets and philosophers of the Transcendental School as they have, for that matter, to this day escaped the attention of all but a few enthusiasts and specialists in Germany's cultural history. This is the more to be wondered at in view of the fact that the subjective landscape has been a dominant tradition in American art and that it was Caspar David Friedrich who led the way in interpreting the landscape as a medium for subjective experience.

The one hundredth anniversary of Caspar David Friedrich's death offers an opportunity for paying tribute to his memory by means of acquainting a wider audience of American art lovers with the quality and scope of his work. For not only is Caspar David Friedrich the apotheosis of the Romantic idealism but he is a medium through which we may come in contact with one of the most constant and characteristic expressions of the German spirit.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.