The Novels of William Hurrell Mallock

The Novels of William Hurrell Mallock

The Novels of William Hurrell Mallock

The Novels of William Hurrell Mallock

Excerpt

Among the notable movements of the later Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries, none has been more significant than the gradual reworking of religious and social beliefs in the light of recent developments in scientific and philosophic thought. The student's gaze is, naturally enough, centered especially on the men who championed the new ideas and gradually brought them into general acceptance. No movement, however, comes to its fulfillment without much opposition on the part both of the general public and of certain individual thinkers. To gain a true perspective of any epoch, therefore, the student should be aware not only of the liberal champions but also, to a lesser degree, of the defenders of the old beliefs. In this connection, it appears reasonable to give some consideration to the works of William Hurrell Mallock. Mallock felt the force of the new science; yet he clung, in many respects, to traditional religion. Furthermore, he was devoted to the established social system in which he had grown up. These views he defended in his works, accepting somewhat of the new, but retaining more of the old. In his literary combat, too, he displayed, though not great originality, at least considerable subtlety of thought, a notable wit, and an epigrammatic style.

The following study of an important part of his literary work-- his novels--may thus well be of real interest to the student of the epoch and its thought.

Albert Morton Turner Ronald B. Levinson . . .

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