The Square Circle

The Square Circle

The Square Circle

The Square Circle

Excerpt

To begin with, and whether we are considering the central patch of sooty green or the respectable houses which surround it, Tiverton Square is most certainly anything but an equilateral rectangle. However, we are used to that here in London, where squares can be almost any shape, including circular and oval, that their original designers may have thought pleasant or convenient, and even three-sided and two-sided squares are by no means unknown. The main requirement, undoubtedly, though even this is sometimes absent, is that central patch with its grass, trees, and shrubberies, with its iron railings and locked gates; and in this respect--albeit Tiverton Square is rounded at all four corners and, apart from this irregularity, forms an elongated parallelogram--we and the residents have nothing whatever to complain of.

The Garden Committee, under the chairmanship of Colonel Parkinthorpe at Number Thirteen, see to it that those railings and gates are duly painted and preserved from decay. Under their direction, also, the grass is mown, the trees are occasionally lopped, and the shrubberies are left severely and scrupulously alone. In the springtime, if the weather has been favourable and the committee hasn't been preoccupied by dissension, and Harris, the gardener, hasn't put the bulbs in far too late, daffodils and crocuses will quite possibly make their appearance. In the summer, if the auguries have been equally encouraging, those rustic tubs will be filled with scarlet geraniums. Otherwise it must be admitted that the flora of this respectable Square will provide very little in the way of colour, apart from that universal, sooty green. There are irises, it is true--you may identify them by . . .

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