A Plain Pathway to Plantations (1624)

A Plain Pathway to Plantations (1624)

A Plain Pathway to Plantations (1624)

A Plain Pathway to Plantations (1624)

Excerpt

When Richard Eburne published A Plain Pathway to Plantations in 1624, the problems of colonization and colonial policy were much in the minds of his fellow countrymen. England was at last awake to the opportunities for aggrandizement and wealth in the New World, and the whole country was talking about the wonders of the lands across the seas. Many Englishmen thought that this concern was long overdue. For nearly a century after Columbus, England slept while Spain and Portugalcarved for themselves empires in America. English sailors, explorers, and buccaneers, it is true, had probed the seven seas and had brought back tales of strange wonders and a vast amount of captured Spanish treasure, but despite the labors of Sir Walter Raleigh and the propaganda of Richard Hakluyt, Englishmen gained no permanent foothold in the New World until four years after the death of the great queen who gave her name to the age. But from the first permanent settlement at Jamestown in 1607 onward, England was committed to colonization on the North Atlantic seaboard.

English claims to territorial rights in this region rested on John Cabot's voyage of discovery in 1497, when that Genoese naturalized in Venice, then in the employ of Henry VII, placed the banner of the English sovereign on some misty landfall on . . .

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