The Influence of Beaumont and Fletcher on Restoration Drama

The Influence of Beaumont and Fletcher on Restoration Drama

The Influence of Beaumont and Fletcher on Restoration Drama

The Influence of Beaumont and Fletcher on Restoration Drama

Excerpt

The purpose of this dissertation is to examine into the possible influence of the Beaumont and Fletcher dramas on the comedies of the Restoration. Generally the Restoration is considered that period beginning with the return of Charles II and the re-opening of the theatres in 1660, and ending arbitrarily in 1700. However, since the works of certain dramatists who continued on beyond the last date--notably Farquhar and Vanbrugh--were in the tradition of the Restoration drama, they also have been considered.

Since it is always difficult to prove a positive influence, the writer has sought to evade the error of dogmatism. He has shown first that the writers of the Restoration were well acquainted with the works of Beaumont and Fletcher, on the stage and in print; that the Restoration audiences had a distinct taste for their plays; second, that critics and dramatists united in praise of the two Jacobeans for their work; third, that Restoration writers altered and borrowed from the Beaumont and Fletcher plays; and finally that the work of the Restoration writers in many important phases is like their models.

The sea of influences which inundated the writers of the Restoration is still poorly charted. Numerous studies have appeared on the French influence, long regarded as the most important of all. Little or nothing has been done on Spanish or Italian influence; yet Spanish novels, in translation, were widely read; Spanish plays were often translated, and troupes of Italian actors, in Italian dramatic entertainments, were popular in London toward the close of the century. Yet . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.