Ascent to Mona as Illustrated by a Short History of Jamaican Medical Care: With an Account of the Beginning of the Faculty of Medicine, University of the West Indies

Ascent to Mona as Illustrated by a Short History of Jamaican Medical Care: With an Account of the Beginning of the Faculty of Medicine, University of the West Indies

Ascent to Mona as Illustrated by a Short History of Jamaican Medical Care: With an Account of the Beginning of the Faculty of Medicine, University of the West Indies

Ascent to Mona as Illustrated by a Short History of Jamaican Medical Care: With an Account of the Beginning of the Faculty of Medicine, University of the West Indies

Excerpt

Seldom will you find a doctor or nurse who does not look back on his or her working life without real pleasure. They have seen that few, if any, other professions give so much satisfaction, such a mingling of caring with intellectual fascination and manual dexterity, as theirs -- provided only that they have the physical makeup to cope with the long hours and the most demanding nature of the work.

Those of us who started the Faculty of Medicine at the University of the West Indies were most fortunate. We had the thrill of developing something everyone in the community believed to be important while having the opportunity of defining the behaviour of unfamiliar diseases as they presented themselves to us. We all felt that our hospital was a fine place in which to work.

Progress in medicine has always depended on the cooperation of other disciplines. We were well aware that, for instance, surgery without anaesthesia would be nothing, and therefore our development required cooperation between all our similarly motivated colleagues. Just as important has been the paramedical and nursing contribution without which the rest could not have happened.

Now -- before those who joined together to turn their dreams into reality are no more -- is the time to tell you what we were trying to achieve: a story which must give some sense of direction and explain why we enjoyed and, I think, largely deserved a wonderful reputation and status in the community. That is something we should still be aiming for today.

Because we lived in a university atmosphere, we were exposed to ideas from other disciplines. Such success as we have had, has been facilitated because of the presence not only of other medical technologies such as microbiology and chemical pathology, but also from our exposure to new . . .

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