Our Jungle Diplomacy

Our Jungle Diplomacy

Our Jungle Diplomacy

Our Jungle Diplomacy

Excerpt

It was in 1904, some months after my return from the Orient, that I was summoned to the War Department for an interview with the Secretary, William Howard Taft. The result of that conversation was my re-entry into the diplomatic service and the resumption of an intensive education in the confused and chaotic foreign policies of the United States and in their profound historical consequences. These policies, as it seems to me, almost predestined the events of December 7, 1941, which, when first reported here, seemed so wholly incredible to so many of my countrymen. I have called this book "Our Jungle Diplomacy," not because my diplomatic assignments so often led me into the vegetal jungles of tropical America, but because, there and elsewhere, our diplomacy has been operating in a political jungle of its own creation. A jungle is a place where there are no paths save those which a man cuts for himself and which close behind him with fresh growths, almost as he passes. It is a place full of small poisonous forms of life, against which precautions are usually vain. It is a place in which the best of guides can easily lose himself and wander blindly, exactly as we have been doing in our diplomacy. All in all, I can think . . .

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