The Shop Committee in the United States

The Shop Committee in the United States

The Shop Committee in the United States

The Shop Committee in the United States

Excerpt

The development of collective bargaining has been the outstanding feature of the history of industrial relations. It had its rise with the organization of workmen by trades and crafts and historically the term "Collective Bargaining" has been used exclusively to describe the system of negotiations between trade unions and employers over the question of wages, hours, and working conditions. As expounded by the Webbs and as practiced by the modern trade union, it involves strong organization on the part of both employer and employee, the representation of the workers by their trade union officials, the subordination of the local union to the national organization and the negotiation of standardized wage scales and working rules for the whole industry or trade. This right of the employee to bargain collectively with his employer, in contrast to the individual contract, has won a general and merited recognition.

Until recently, the modern employer has followed one of two courses, collective bargaining with the union, or individual dealings with his employees. But the advent of the shop committee has opened a third course. The shop committee, as introduced and developed in the United States, is based upon the idea of bargaining between the employees and employer of individual plants or the plants of one employer. It rests on the assumption that the normal economic relationship of labor and capital is in the individual factory; that industrial government should function within the productive units rather than between national organizations of these . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.