The Ethics of Competition, and Other Essays

The Ethics of Competition, and Other Essays

The Ethics of Competition, and Other Essays

The Ethics of Competition, and Other Essays

Excerpt

The purpose of this book is to make available to students of the social sciences some of Professor Knight's essays which have particular relevance to the problems faced by society to-day. While these articles are of general interest, most of them have appeared in technical journals, and are thus relatively inaccessible. The idea of publishing a collection suggested itself to a small group who had attended a dinner on the occasion of Professor Knight's forty-ninth birthday, November 7, 1934, but not until all arrangements had been made and the selection of the contents completed was Professor Knight informed of the project. The entire responsibility for the choice of articles thus falls on us; had the selection been made by the author, not only might the contents have been different, but some revisions might have been made.

Although we have attempted to choose articles which are representative of Professor Knight's work, the collection is not to be regarded as a synthesis of his thought. Perhaps, however, a unifying thread may be found in the problem of social control and its various implications. Only one article dealing with interest or capital theory has been included, because this is a subject about which Professor Knight has radically altered his views, furthermore, he is at present writing a book on this topic.

The compilation of the bibliography was a considerable task, since Professor Knight has kept no record of his publications. This was undertaken several years ago by Miss Alice Hanson and later was considerably expanded by Mr. Homer Jones; it has been brought up to date by Miss Gladys Hamilton.

We are greatly indebted to Professor Lionel Robbins of the London School of Economics and to Professor Jacob Viner of the University of Chicago for suggestions and assistance without which the project could not have been carried through. The advice of Professor Henry Simons has been particularly helpful in the selection of the articles; and we wish also to acknowledge the co-operation of the various other members of the Department of Economics at the University of Chicago.

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