The Psychology of the Adolescent

The Psychology of the Adolescent

The Psychology of the Adolescent

The Psychology of the Adolescent

Excerpt

A discussion of the problems of adolescence should be useful for various reasons. In the first place, it may be helpful to adolescents themselves. Each year, for more than ten years past, students in the later years of adolescence have been among those in attendance upon the lectures out of which this book has grown. None has been more eager in pursuit of the study than they. The intelligent youth who is actually in the midst of the adjustments here considered may profit from the definite, impersonal formulation of the persistent problems of youth everywhere. Too often the struggles of an adolescent are made harder by the idea that he or she alone is being called upon to pass through these experiences. To realize that these are universal problems about which generalizations may be offered is in itself helpful.

For the guardians of youth, especially for parents and teachers, such a book should be of use. To have been an adolescent years ago is not necessarily, or even probably, to remember what an adolescent is like. To have been an infant is not to know what an infant's problems really are. Each of the developmental periods of life brings its own characteristic problems, minimizing and obscuring those that preceded. Therefore parents of adolescents, being themselves engrossed with the special problems of maturity--reproduction, the build-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.