The History of Israel: From the Beginning to the Exile - Vol. 1

The History of Israel: From the Beginning to the Exile - Vol. 1

The History of Israel: From the Beginning to the Exile - Vol. 1

The History of Israel: From the Beginning to the Exile - Vol. 1

Excerpt

The Storia d'Israele, first published some fifteen years ago, has since gone through four editions. The fact that it was quickly translated into French and Spanish serves to indicate the welcome that awaited it on the Continent. In America all to whom the original Italian was no obstacle used and appreciated it almost at once. Its appearance in English now makes it possible for a much larger audience to satisfy its hunger for knowledge about the history of God's dealings with the Chosen People.

This HISTORY OF ISRAEL, moreover, fills in what has been a lamentable gap in the field of Catholic scriptural literature in English. Up to the present, English-speaking Catholics have had little to appeal to in this field, aside from manuals of general or special introduction, and, more recently, the Catholic Biblical Quarterly and the English periodical Scripture.

Thus there has never been, in English, anything that quite compares with the famous histories of Wellhausen, Kittel, Renan, or Loisy, to mention only a few of the foreign authors whose works have influenced thought even in America. Most of these works were written according to principles which for Catholics were wholly or in part inadmissible, and the conclusions, naturally, were often such that Catholics could not and would not allow them.

The importance and the timeliness of this HISTORY OF ISRAEL, therefore, is easy to grasp. It was written by a Catholic priest well trained in oriental languages, familiar with the Holy Land, thoroughly acquainted with non-Catholic literature, and able to appreciate the complexities of the problems raised by the Bible and the new discoveries of historians and archaeologists. His work is somewhat unique in this latter respect, in that it so faithfully evaluates and assimilates what is good in the findings of modern archaeology.

Add to these qualifications the facts that the author writes easily and interestingly, tells the story simply, and keeps it moving. Disputed points are presented as disputed points and are discussed calmly and reasonably. A sense of proportion is one of the chief features of the book . . .

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