Introduction to Musicology: A Survey of the Fields, Systematic & Historical, of Musical Knowledge & Research

Introduction to Musicology: A Survey of the Fields, Systematic & Historical, of Musical Knowledge & Research

Introduction to Musicology: A Survey of the Fields, Systematic & Historical, of Musical Knowledge & Research

Introduction to Musicology: A Survey of the Fields, Systematic & Historical, of Musical Knowledge & Research

Excerpt

To those who wish to broaden their understanding of music by surveying the fields, both systematic and historical, of musical knowledge and research, the present work offers information not usually covered in the musician's technical training and presents a survey of these fields as a whole.

Inevitably, the greater the area surveyed, the more superficial the treatment. But loss in depth is in some measure compensated; the synoptic view avoids the errors arising from "not being able to see the woods for the trees." It may not be possible to see both at once. Particular experience is a matter of immediate awareness; generic concepts result from later reflection and interpretation. Yet musicians may attain some happy balance between immediate awareness, rich in content but without depth, and abstract concepts, full of depth but without content. Some such balance is necessary for a well-rounded philosophy of music.

As a research subject, musicology properly belongs in the graduate field; but, as the broad systematization of musical knowledge, an introductory course in musicology belongs among the undergraduate studies of every music student. Many reasons support this conclusion. First, every musician should have some fundamental knowledge of acoustics, psy-

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