Vacuum Manipulation of Volatile Compounds: A Laboratory Manual Describing the Application of High Vacuum Technique in Experimental Chemistry

Vacuum Manipulation of Volatile Compounds: A Laboratory Manual Describing the Application of High Vacuum Technique in Experimental Chemistry

Vacuum Manipulation of Volatile Compounds: A Laboratory Manual Describing the Application of High Vacuum Technique in Experimental Chemistry

Vacuum Manipulation of Volatile Compounds: A Laboratory Manual Describing the Application of High Vacuum Technique in Experimental Chemistry

Excerpt

Within the last thirty or forty years, the development of good vacuum pumps, refrigerants, and a glass capable of withstanding thermal shock has made possible an excellent technique for the study of volatile chemical compounds. This is the high vacuum technique, which permits quantitative handling of materials, even in very small amounts, in a very convenient manner.

Despite the large amount of work which has been done in this field, descriptions of the methods and apparatus involved are so scattered in the literature, and so often concealed in experimental details of apparently unrelated chemical work, that it has been difficult for one to begin to use this technique without learning it from another individual. It is the purpose of this book, therefore, to provide in one place enough practical information to enable an investigator with an average background of scientific training and experience to construct and operate a general purpose high vacuum apparatus for chemical research.

Although the text is intended primarily as an introduction to vacuum technique, the book should be useful also, as a reference, to those who are already familiar with most of the procedures described. Of especial value should be the lengthy table of vapor pressures of pure compounds.

Vacuum technique as applied to chemistry is, in a sense, an art. There are alternative methods of doing almost everything, and it is expected that others of experience may prefer to practice procedures different from those described herein. There is certainly no intent to imply that the methods given in this book are necessarily the best; it is only claimed that they are workable and should provide a foundation from which an investigator may build and modify as much as desired. Neither is there intent to imply that this book is comprehensive. It is hoped, however, that it contains enough information to fulfill its stated purpose. I shall welcome any suggestions for its improvement.

The present state of development of this vacuum technique is . . .

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